Teaching & Learning

SIP Initiatives

The following are resources for schools interested in developing Professional Learning Communities. 

 THE POWER OF TWO

An elementary and secondary principal provide an interesting look at how they collaborated together on a regular basis to help each other solve everyday problems and improve instruction in their schools.  (ASCD October 2009 - Sterrett and Hass

Click here to read the article


INSTRUCTIONAL ROUNDS

Taking a cue from the medical profession, this blog from ED. Magazine from the Harvard School of Education  describes how instructional leaders can use the "medical rounds" approach to help schools develop practices to improve student achievement.  (gse.harvard.edu - September 2009)

Click here to read the blog

 

D200 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVES MODEL

The model was developed by D200 educational administrators to illustrate the alignment of the various initiatives and the guiding beliefs for school improvement.   At the base of the tree are the guiding beliefs represented by the roots.  The main branches of the tree represent the core areas of focus for each building.  The leaves of the tree are the individual activities that implement the core areas of focus which in turn actualize the guiding beliefs.

Click here for the model

THE PRINCIPAL AS A STAFF DEVELOPER

This article was written by Rick Dufor and Timothy Berkey and published in the Journal of Staff Development  in the fall of 1995.  Principals play a pivotal role in the creation of a school culture that enables teachers to learn and grow in order to achieve the school improvment reform goals of the school. This article provides some food for thought for principals interested in developing this type of environment in their school.

Click here to read the entire article

 

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN A FOCUS ON TEACHING AND A FOCUS ON LEARNING

This reproducible chart from Learning By Doing published by Solutions Tree 2006, is an excellent way to visually see how the culture of a school changes when it focus on what students have learned instead of what the teachers have taught.   It is an excellent tool to use with your staff to evaluate where they are on the continuum and what specific areas they would like to focus on for change.  Great conversations can be had at a building and individual team level with this document.

Click here for the chart

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